Review: Fur – ‘Grow Up’

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Indie anthem heaven

Unsurprisingly, FUR have delivered yet again with another five star single.

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FUR, one of the UK’s most promising indie bands, are well and truly proving that they are the next big thing emerging onto the indie music scene. Following recent singles ‘Trouble Always Finds Me’ and ‘Nothing (Until Something Comes Along)’, which are both absolutely SOAKED in 60s and 70s nostalgia, the band, formed in Brighton, are back at what couldn’t be a more perfect time.

The new single ‘Grow Up’ came out a little later than the band had originally planned, and the boys have promised on their twitter to ‘make it up to you [the fans]in the next few months’, yet this doesn’t stop the new record from hitting that mark and satisfying the constant craving for new music. The record opens with a consistent energetic drum beat, brought by drummer Flynn Whelan, before the striking guitar moulds it all together creating a coalescent blend of heavenly retro motifs, giving the single its distinct 60s inspired vibe that the band have incorporated to their trademark sound.

Unlike many singles from bands and artists the song isn’t relevant to the present situation, and to be quite honest, I’m glad; I’ve had enough of ‘quarantine jams’ and songs that evoke a longing for pre-corona time. FUR’s new record focuses on the social and personal anxieties that surround growing up and the possibility of not having anyone to ‘cry on their shoulder’, which is definitely a common situation that many of us find ourselves in. After all, being an adult isn’t really what it’s cracked up to be. When listening to the track it’s easy to see that the lyrics are deeply personal and come from a sincere place, as the uncertainty of what the future holds takes centre stage as the most principal theme. Lead vocalist, Murray, starts with asking ‘What’s gonna happen if I don’t like being older?’ proving to be a particular thought-provoking opening line as listeners find themselves dwelling on the same fears of growing up and the frightful feeling of loneliness.

As the record progresses the chorus introduces layered vocals, featuring harmonies that blend together seamlessly as the lyrics suggest that getting older can become somewhat an obsession. Murray confesses to having ‘thought about it one too many times’. This is where the record shifts from a happy swinging indie record to a track that has a much deeper meaning, highlighting how certain anxieties can affect everyday life and even relationships and friendships, with it’s suggestions of ‘running away’. Whether this refers to procrastinating and running away from anxieties or not, it still nonetheless, is extremely impactful as the matter of adolescence is of course, inevitable.

The record really is about troubles and issues we all face when the time comes to ‘find ourselves’ as we evolve into the kind of person we wish to be. This is, at times, harder than we anticipate which is where the anxiety seems to manifest, especially for FUR as it seems to be a big deal for the band. As musicians, however, they have already successfully established who they are and what they’re about. This single is the kind of track that reminds you to try and live in the moment rather than worrying about things that are evidently uncontrollable and out of your hands, although it is a bittersweet reassurance nonetheless.

Not to mention the artwork designed by talented Julia Nalaskowski, who seems to photograph the band frequently, is perfect for what the song is about. Featuring building blocks and a television set adorning the band’s iconic logo, it paints a laid back scene and aesthetic which combines with the song in perfect harmony.

Everything about this single is flawless and I’m going to be listening to it non-stop for weeks.

FUR are back and have only gone and bloody done it, a five-star single and nothing less.

‘Grow Up’ is available to listen to now via Nice Swan Records.

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classic culture editor 20/21. 3rd year english student with an unhealthy shakespeare, hannibal lecter and 70s nostalgia obsession.

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